Thursday, December 20, 2018

AJiC Fact Sheets present 1986–2017 data on drug arrests in Alaska by type of drug and sex of arrestee

The 18-06 and 18-07 (December 2018) issues of the AJiC Fact Sheet present data on drug sale and manufacture arrests and drug possession arrests in Alaska for 1986 to 2017 by type of drug and sex of arrestee. Types of drugs include narcotics, synthetic narcotics, marijuana, and other non-narcotic drugs. Data are drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.

Drug Sale and Manufacture Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017 — Drug Types by Sex (click through to PDF)Drug Sale and Manufacture Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017 — Drug Types by Sex
(AJiC Fact Sheet 18-06)

This fact sheet presents data on drug sale and manufacture arrests by type of drug and sex of arrestee as reported by Alaska law enforcement agencies for the 32-year period 1986 to 2017. Types of drugs include narcotics, synthetic narcotics, marijuana, and other non-narcotic drugs. Overall, males comprise roughly three-fourths of the total drug sale and manufacture arrests in the state of Alaska. The female and male rates parallel one another in that they rise and fall at the same points in most years.  For all drugs, the difference between female and male arrest rates in 2017 are smaller than in 1986.

Citation:

Drug Possession Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017 — Drug Types by Sex (click through to PDF)Drug Possession Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017 — Drug Types by Sex
(AJiC Fact Sheet 18-07)

This fact sheet presents data on drug possession arrests by type of drug and sex of arrestee as reported by Alaska law enforcement agencies for the 32-year period 1986 to 2017. Types of drugs include narcotics, synthetic narcotics, marijuana, and other non-narcotic drugs. Overall, males comprise roughly four out of five drug possession arrests in the state of Alaska. The female and male rates parallel one another in that they rise and fall at the same points in most years.

Citation:
The fact sheets are by Benjamin Ervin, Research Professional, Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC). The AJiC Fact Sheet series addresses various crime and criminal justice topics.

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Justice Center seeks a Communications Coodinator & Editor

UAA Justice Center seeks a Communications Coodinator & Editor
The UAA Justice Center is seeking a Communications Coodinator & Editor.
This position provides editorial assistance with the preparation of Alaska Justice Forum articles, research reports, scholarly papers and presentations, and research proposals. The position orchestrates and supervises the entire publication process for the Alaska Justice Forum, including developing publication content with a focus on integration and synthesis of research findings on justice topics/issues. The successful candidate will serve as the Justice Center's media liaison and will also coordinate and supervise Justice Center public activities and events.

Requirements:

  • Knowledge of communications theory and application in research, execution and evaluation of communications functions, best practices, and industry standards.
  • Ability to mutli-task in a timely manner.
  • Knowledge of cross-cultural communications, including translation of technical documents into forms accessible to general audiences.
  • Ability to design print, multimedia, Web and collateral material.
  • Ability to work and solve problems independently.
See the full job posting at the Careers at UAA website.

For more information contact the UAA Justice Center at (907) 786-1810.

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Dr. Myrstol & Dr. Johnson on Hometown Alaska discuss sexual assault research

On Alaska Public Media's "Hometown Alaska — Justice Alaska," 19 Nov 2018:
(front, left to right) Judge Elaine Andrews (ret), host; Dr. Ingrid Johnson,
UAA Justice Center; Dr. Brad Myrstol, Director, UAA Justice Center; (back)
host Kathleen McCoy, Alaska Public Media.
Photo by Shelly Wozniak, UAA College of Health
Dr. Brad Myrstol, Director of the UAA Justice Center and the Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC) and Dr. Ingrid Johnson of the UAA Justice Center joined hosts Kathleen McCoy of Alaska Public Media and Judge Elaine Andrews (ret.) on Alaska Public Media's Justice Alaska on Hometown Alaska on November 19.

The program focused on UAA Justice Center's research mission, with a particular emphasis on research being undertaken by Dr. Johnson to support the Alaska Department of Public Safety's sexual assault kit initiative (SAKI), which is focused on improving the Alaska State Troopers' and partner agencies' responses to sexual assault.

Learn more about the Alaska Sexual Assault Kit Initiative (AK-SAKI):
Additional resources are available on the Alaska Public Media website, where the full program can also be heard:

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Legal Studies program seeking an Assistant Professor of Justice

The Justice Center's Legal Studies program is searching for an Assistant Professor of Justice

This tenure-track position is responsible for teaching and providing professional service to the  University, to the profession/discipline, and to the community. Incumbent is expected to teach  undergraduate legal studies courses on a variety of substantive and skills-based topics in legal studies and to serve as liaison with the Alaska legal community, developing career, service, and  internship opportunities for students. The standard instructional workload is 4 courses per semester.

Requirements:
  • Juris Doctor degree from a law school approved by the American Bar Association.
  • Member in good standing of the Alaska Bar Association or the bar association of another state.
  • Experience practicing criminal law is preferred, but not required.
  • Seeking applicants that reflect the increasing diversity present in our community student body.
See the full job posting at the Careers at UAA website.

For more information contact the UAA Justice Center at (907) 786-1810.

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Homelessness and Crime (JUSTA490-001) examines social problems associated with homelessness, including crime and victimization

Homelessness and Crime (JUSTA490-001) flyer
What are best practices to move people out of homelessness? How do we deal with crime and other social problems associated with homelessness? How can we reduce the very high rates of victimization among homeless people? Who becomes homeless and why?

These question will be examined in Homelessness and Crime (JUSTA490-001). This Spring 2019 elective course will be held Mondays and Wednesdays from 10:00 to 11:15 AM.

  • CRN: 37056 (Note: There are multiple sections of JUST A490. Be sure to use the right CRN for this course!)
  • Catalog description: JUST A490 is a variable topics course which addresses current issues. Topics of national interest as well as those peculiar to Alaska will be included. 
  • Special note: JUST A490 may be repeated once for credit with a change in subtitle. 
  • Prerequisites: JUST A11O with Junior or Senior standing (exceptions made upon instructor approval). Ask about an override if you have a Social Science GER other than JUST A110.

For more information, contact Prof. Sharon Chamard at sechamard@alaska.edu or 786-1813.

Registration for Spring 2019 courses begins on November 12 for seniors and November 13 for juniors.

Environmental Crime Prevention (JUST A332) explores how to reduce crime by altering the environment

Environmental Crime Prevention (JUST A332) flyer
We can reduce crime without trying to make people better. The Spring 2019 course Environmental Crime Prevention (JUSTA332) explores how this is possible through altering the environment to reduce opportunities to commit crime. We’ll look at practical applications of different aspects of environmental crime prevention such as defensible space, crime prevention through environmental design, situational crime prevention, and problem-oriented policing.

This class will be useful if you

  • want to learn how to reduce your own risk of being a crime victim;
  • work in retail and want to keep customers and employees from stealing from you;
  • are curious about the relationship between human behavior and design of places;
  • are in real estate and want to provide safer spaces for your tenants;
  • wonder how urban design and street patterns contribute to crime.

This elective course will be held Mondays and Wednesdays, 11:30 to 12:45 PM.

  • CRN: 37051
  • Catalog description: Examines the theoretical background to opportunity— reducing in environmental crime prevention. Explores the application and implementation of crime prevention through environmental design, defensible space, and problem-oriented policing. Illustrates the practical and policy difficulties of environmental crime prevention through the use of case studies and field work.
  • Special note: JUST A320 recommended
  • Prerequisites: JUST A200 and JUST A201 and (JUST A251 or SOC A251).

Prerequisites a problem? Ask about a registration override!

For more information, contact Prof. Sharon Chamard at sechamard@alaska.edu or 786-1813.

Registration for Spring 2019 courses begins on November 12 for seniors, November 13 for juniors, and November 14 for sophomores.

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Compensation for disabling injuries focus of course on Torts, Worker’s Compensation, & Insurance Law (LEGL/JUST A380)

Torts, Worker’s Compensation, & Insurance Law (LEGL/JUST A380) flyer
There are 26 million disabling injuries every year in the U.S.—and the economic cost of those injuries reach into the hundreds of billions. Why is the compensation system for such injuries so expensive, burdensome, inadequate, and slow? Does it work to deter unsafe conduct and products? Is it possible to be both fair and administratively efficient? Torts, Worker’s Compensation, & Insurance Law (LEGL/JUST A380) will examine these questions.

Studying tort law involves a lot more than learning doctrinal rules—it integrates a fundamental understanding of the American legal system. It’s also a great way to learn some professional skills in a true-to-life setting.

This Spring 2019 elective will be held Mondays and Wednesdays from 5:30 to 6:45 PM.
  • CRN: 37060
  • Catalog description: Analyzes nature and function of the law of torts, workers' compensation, and liability insurance in the United States, as well as the role of the nonlawyer legal professional in tort litigation and workers' compensation claims. Includes ethical issues in tort, workers' compensation, and insurance cases. Practice in Alaska and the development of professional skills are emphasized. Legal specialty course.
  • Registration Restrictions: Completion of LEGL A356 is strongly recommended.
  • Prerequisites: LEGL A101 with a minimum grade of C and LEGL A215 with a minimum grade of C.
If course prerequisites are a problem, ask about a registration override.

For more info, contact Prof. Kristin Knudsen at kknudsen@alaska.edu or 786-4885.

Registration for Spring 2019 courses begins on November 12.

Victimization (JUSTA490-002) examines how we might better respond to and enable justice for victims of crime

Victimization (JUSTA490-002) flyer
The study of victimization is among the most complex topics in criminology. The complexity starts with trying to understand victimization itself. Why are people victimized? What does it mean to be victimized? What is harm? The complexity increases when we seek justice for those who have been victimized. What does justice mean for victims? Can justice for victims be integrated into a fair and balanced justice system?

Through our semester-long exploration in Victimization (JUSTA490-002), we will seek to answer these and other questions and to envision how social systems might more adequately respond to and enable justice for victims of crime.

This Spring 2019 elective course will be held Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1:00 to 2:15 PM. There will be no textbook — all readings will be provided via Blackboard, free of charge.

  • CRN: 37057 (Note: There are multiple sections of JUST A490. Be sure to use the right CRN for this course!)
  • Catalog description: JUST A490 is a variable topics course which addresses current issues. Topics of national interest as well as those peculiar to Alaska will be included. 
  • Special Note: JUST A490 may be repeated once for credit with a change in subtitle. 
  • Prerequisites: JUST A11O with Junior or Senior standing (exceptions made upon instructor approval)

Contact Dr. Ingrid Johnson at idjohnson@alaska.edu or (907) 786-1126 with questions.

Registration for Spring 2019 courses begins on November 12 for seniors and November 13 for juniors.

Course on Probation, Parole and Community Corrections (JUST A445) explores supervision of offenders in the community

Probation, Parole and Community Corrections (JUST A445) flyer
Community corrections programs oversee offenders outside of jail or prison, and are administered by agencies or courts with the legal authority to enforce sanctions. Community corrections includes probation — correctional supervision within the community rather than jail or prison — and parole — a period of conditional, supervised release from prison.

Probation, Parole and Community Corrections (JUST A445) will examine how the system of probation and parole developed, practices and methods of supervision of probationers and parolees, and programs for the reentry and reintegration of offenders into the community.

This Spring 2019 elective will be held Mondays and Wednesdays from 1:00 to 2:15 PM.
  • CRN: 31502
  • Catalog description: Covers the history and development of probation and parole, including notions of rehabilitation, reentry and reintegration. Investigates evidence-based standards, and numerous and diverse types of supervision, treatment, control, restoration and supportive programs for criminal offenders within the community.
  • Prerequisites: JUST 110 & Junior/Senior Standing
Questions? Contact Dr. Rita Augustyn at rjaugustyn2@alaska.edu or 907-786-4302.

Registration for Spring 2019 courses begins on November 12 for seniors and November 13 for juniors.

Police–Community Relations (JUST A434) explores the relationships between police and the many “publics” they serve

Police–Community Relations (JUST A434) flyer
At the heart of democratic governance are notions of limited authority, equality before the law, citizen voice and participation, legitimacy, and consent. Due to their unique capacity to use force in order to obtain compliance, and because they represent to embodiment of governmental power and authority to most citizens, the police represent an institutional site of ongoing social and cultural conflict.

In Police–Community Relations (JUST A434), we will explore the nature of the relationships that exist between police and the many “publics” they serve, the factors that influence and give shape to those relationships, and to evaluate the implications of police – community relations for policing a democratic society.

This Spring 2019 elective will be held Mondays and Wednesday from 2:30 to 3:45 PM.

  • CRN: 37054
  • Catalog description: Examines police-community relations in the United States. Explores common conceptions of the police role, from the perspective of both the public and the police themselves, and their impact on police-community relations. Particular emphasis is given to recent developments aimed at ameliorating strained relationships between the police and the various communities they serve. 
  • Registration Restrictions: Senior standing or instructor approval
  • Prerequisites: JUST A110 and JUST A200 and JUST A201

Course prerequisites a problem? Ask about a registration override!

Interested students are encouraged to contact Dr. Brad Myrstol at bamyrstol@alaska.edu or 907.786.1837 with questions.

Registration for Spring 2019 courses begins on November 12 for seniors and November 13 for juniors.

Monday, November 5, 2018

Crime Analysis & Mapping (JUST A432) course gives practical training in common crime analysis tasks used in law enforcement

Crime Analysis & Mapping (JUST A432) flyer
Crime analysis is the practical application of data analysis — and is essential to many modern approaches to solving crime problems. Focused on doing analysis instead of talking about it, Crime Analysis & Mapping (JUST A432), introduces crime analysis tasks based on scenarios commonly faced by crime analysts in law enforcement agencies throughout the US.

The course gives students practical training in ArcGIS for Desktop and Excel, two of the most commonly-used tools in the industry. Enrollment includes a one-year academic license for ArcGIS for installation on your computer.

This Spring 2019 elective course will be held Tuesdays 2:30 to 5:15 PM.
  • CRN: 31500
  • Catalog description: Introduces analytical concepts and computer applications used in the study of temporal and spatial crime data. Demonstrates how these techniques can be used by justice agencies with a special emphasis given to police departments. 
  • Registration restrictions: Completion of all GER Tier 1 (basic college-level skills) courses and • Junior or senior standing
  • Prerequisites: JUST A200 with a minimum grade of C and JUST A201 with a minimum grade of C.
  • Attributes: UAA Integrative Capstone GER.
Contact: Dr. Troy Payne, tpayne9@alaska.edu

Registration for Spring 2019 courses begins on November 12 for seniors and November 13 for juniors.

The Courts (JUST A374) course examines the impact of courts on law, society, and politics

The Courts (JUST 374) flyer
Who really has the power in the court room? How did our courts evolve? What happens as a case moves through the legal system? Where do you find modern research on the courts’ impact on law, society, and politics?

Find out in the Spring 2019 course The Courts (JUST 374), to be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:30 AM to 12:45 PM.

This is a required course for the Legal Studies B.A., a selective course for the Justice B.A., and a selective course for the Paralegal AAS, PBCT.

  • CRN: 31496
  • Catalog description: Examines the basic components of the U.S. courts with particular emphasis on case processing through the court system and the roles of court actors. Covers the history as well as the current structure and function of the court system and assesses the gap between the ideals and the realities of court processes and practices.
  • Registration restrictions: Junior or senior standing.
  • Prerequisites: JUST A110 or LEGL A101.
For more info, contact Prof. Kristin Knudsen at kknudsen@alaska.edu or 786-4885.

Registration for Spring 2019 courses begins on November 12 for seniors and November 13 for juniors.

Friday, November 2, 2018

Interested in law school? Join us Tuesday, Nov. 6 over pizza to discuss law school admissions

Society of Law and Justice, University of Alaska Anchorage
Interested in law school? Join the Society of Law and Justice Tuesday, November 6 from noon to 1:00 in SSB 213 for a pizza lunch and discussion with Prof. Terry Price of the University of Washington School of Law. Prof. Price will be discussing both the program at the University of Washington and the law school admissions policy in general.

University of Washington School of Law

Substance Abuse and Crime course (JUST A366) explores relationship between substance abuse and crime

JUST A366 — Substance Use and Crime flyerWhat’s the relation between substance use and crime? What is the underlying mechanism? How does society treat drug-involved offenders?

Find out in the Spring 2019 course Substance Abuse and Crime (JUST A366). This elective course will be held Tuesdays and Thursdays from 2:30 to 3:45 PM.
  • CRN: 37053
  • Catalog description: Introduces the psychopharmacology, physiological effects and schedule classification for substance of abuse. Reviews data estimating extent of use, abuse and related consequences. Provides a critical analysis of the connection between crime and substance use. Differentiates between policy responses to substance use and abuse including prevention, treatment, enforcement and harm reduction.
  • Registration restrictions: Junior or senior standing.
  • Prerequisite: JUST A110.
Contact Dr. Yeungjeom Lee at ylee41@alaska.edu with questions.

Registration for Spring 2019 courses begins on November 12 for seniors and November 13 for juniors.

Thursday, November 1, 2018

60 Years Later: The Alaska Constitution, History in Context — videos and symposium materials available online

60 Years Later: The Alaska Constitution, History in Context
"60 Years Later: The Alaska Constitution, History in Context" drew over 75 attendees on October 12 at the UAA/APU Consortium Library.

The symposium was co-sponsored by the UAA Justice Center and the Alaska Law Review in cooperation with the Historians Committee of the Alaska Bar Association. The program was approved for 4.5 CLE credits (including 1.5 Ethics credits) by the Alaska Bar Association. Prof. Ryan Fortson, J.D., Ph.D., is the Justice Center faculty coordinator for this event.

The topic of this year's symposium was selected in anticipation of the sixtieth anniversary of Alaska statehood. The Constitution of the State of Alaska was adopted by the Alaska Constitutional Convention February 5, 1956; ratified by the people of Alaska April 24, 1956; and became operative with the formal proclamation of Alaska statehood on January 3, 1959.


Erwin Chemerinsky
Erwin Chemerinsky,
Dean of Berkeley Law
Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean of Berkeley Law, was keynote speaker for the event. Symposium topics included the Alaska Judicial Council and the merit selection of judges, Alaska Native perspectives on Alaska's Constitution, a presentation on unpublished materials written by the late Judge Thomas B. Stewart — who served as secretary of the Alaska Constitutional Convention — about the movement for Alaska Statehood and the development of the Alaska Constitution, and a lunchtime conversation between retired Judge Sen K. Tan and Alaska Constitutional Convention delegate Vic Fischer.

The Alaska Law Review will be publishing an issue at a later date with articles prepared for the symposium. The Alaska Law Review is published by Duke University School of Law for the Alaska Bar Association. Meantime, symposium drafts of conference papers and videos of all sessions are available for download at the UAA Justice Center website.

""
Erwin Chereminksy, Dean, Berkeley Law delivers the keynote address at the Alaska Law Symposium "60 Years Later: The Alaska Constitution, History in Context," 12 Oct 2018.
""
Panel on "A Comparative Persepctive of the Alaska Constitution." Left to right: moderator Tom Metzloff of Duke University and presenters G. Alan Tarr, Rutgers University and Center for State Constitution Studies, and Robert F. Williams, Rutgers School of Lawz
Panel on "The Alaska Judicial Council and Merit Selection of Judges."
Panel on "The Alaska Judicial Council and Merit Selection of Judges." Left to right: Judge Larry Card (ret.) and presenters Susie Mason Dosik, administrative attorney for the Alaska Judicial Council, and Brett Frazer of Latham & Watkins.
Panel on "A Native Perspective of Alaska's Constitution"
Prof. Ryan Fortson, UAA Justice Center (right) introduces "A Native Perspective of Alaska's Constitution" panelists (seated left to right): Andy Erickson of Landye Bennett Blumstein LLP, John "Sky" Starkey of Landye Bennett Blumstein LLP, and Willie Hensley, University of Alaska Anchorage.
Judge Sen K. Tan (ret.) and Alaska Constitutional Convention delegate Vic Fischer.
Judge Sen K. Tan (ret.) and Alaska Constitutional Convention delegate Vic Fischer.

Monday, October 29, 2018

Dr. Myrstol & Dr. Johnson on Talk of Alaska discuss domestic violence in Alaska

Host and guests of Alaska Public Media's Talk of Alaska, 23 Oct 2019
(left to right): Dr. Angelina Trujillo, UAA School of Nursing; Lori Townsend,
Alaska Public Media; Dr. Brad Myrstol, Director of the
UAA Justice Center; and Dr. Ingrid Johnson, UAA Justice Center.
Dr. Brad Myrstol, Director of the UAA Justice Center and the Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC) and Dr. Ingrid Johnson of the UAA Justice Center joined Dr. Angelina Trujillo of the UAA School of Nursing on Alaska Public Media's Talk of Alaska program to discuss the impacts of domestic violence and sexual assault on communities, public safety, and the healthcare system in Alaska. The program was hosted by Lori Townsend of Alaska Public Media, was part of Alaska Public Media's coverage of Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

The program can be heard on the Alaska Public Media website:

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Keep the Hang, Not the Hangover: UAA hosts day of conversation about alcohol and college life Oct. 16

Keep the Hang, Not the Hangover: A day of conversation on alcohol and college life
"Keep the Hang, Not the Hangover: A day of conversation on alcohol and college life” on October 16 invites students to join in three conversations on alcohol use and misuse, experiences and campus resources for recovery, and shared responsibility in responding to alcohol misuse and its related harms.

  • Date: Tuesday, October 16, 2018
  • Time: 10 AM – 2 PM
  • Place: UAA/APU Consortium Library, LIB 307
  • Admission: Free for all UAA and Anchorage community members
  • Registration: Register for one, two, or all three conversations through this link or follow the individual links below. The three conversations can be attended in full or individually.
  • Parking: Free parking in Library Lot

The event is sponsored by the UAA College of Health, the UAA Alcohol, Drug and Wellness Education Program, and Recover Alaska.

You Good, Bro? — 10:00 AM

Register at yougoodbro.eventbrite.com. — This conversation will explore the spectrum of alcohol misuse and give participants the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding into their own relationship to alcohol. We will look at the current conversation around alcohol use and misuse and discuss topics ranging from social norms to the stress of transitions.

Sober is the New Drunk — 11:30 AM (lunch included)

Register at soberisthenewdrunk.eventbrite.com. — A session focusing on the resources available to students on campus Recovering students and on-campus student supports will be invited to participate in a panel. Discussion will be guided around questions about alcohol abuse and recovery.

Designated: Responsibility and Consumption — 12:30 PM

Register at designated.eventbrite.com. — Join us as we discuss individual and communal responsibility, talk about bystander intervention and look at ways to increase our collective sense of responsibility around impaired driving, interpersonal violence, mental health, and excessive alcohol consumption.

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Justice Center co-sponsors Oct 12 symposium on the Alaska Constitution

60 Years Later: The Alaska Constitution, History in Context
In anticipation of the sixtieth anniversary of Alaska statehood, "60 Years Later: The Alaska Constitution, History in Context" will be presented Friday, October 12 at the UAA/APU Consortium Library. The symposium is co-sponsored by the UAA Justice Center and the Alaska Law Review in cooperation with the Historians Committee of the Alaska Bar Association. Admission is free, and lunch will be provided.

Date: Friday, October 12
Time: 8:30 - 1:15 p.m.
Place: UAA/APU Consortium Library, LIB 307
Parking: Free parking on Fridays.

This symposium is geared for lawyers, members of the judiciary, representatives of Alaska Native organizations, state government officials, UAA students, faculty, and staff, and members of the public. The Alaska Law Review will be publishing an issue at a later date with articles prepared for this symposium.

This program has been approved for 4.5 CLE credits (including 1.5 Ethics credits) by the Alaska Bar Association.

Program

Keynote Address

  • Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean, Berkeley Law
“A Comparative Perspective of the Alaska Constitution”
  • Professor G. Alan Tarr, Rutgers University; Center for State Constitution Studies
  • Professor Robert Williams, Rutgers School of Law; Center for State Constitution Studies
“The Alaska Judicial Council and Merit Selection of Judges”
  • Susie Mason Dosik, Administrative Attorney, Alaska Judicial Council
  • Brett Frazer, Latham & Watkins
“A Native Perspective of Alaska’s Constitution”
  • John “Sky” Starkey, Landye Bennett Blumstein LLP
  • Willie Hensley, University of Alaska Anchorage
Lunch Presentation
  • Mike Schwaiger, Alaska Bar Association, Historians Committee
Lunch Conversation
  •  Vic Fischer, Member of the Alaska Constitutional Convention & Hon. Sen Tan, Alaska Superior Court, ret.
Prof. Ryan Fortson, J.D., Ph.D., is the Justice Center faculty coordinator for this event. Questions? Call 907-786-1810 or email uaa.justice@alaska.edu.

Monday, September 10, 2018

AJiC Fact Sheet presents data on drug sale and manufacture arrests and drug possession arrests in Alaska for 1986 to 2017

The 18-04 and 18-05 (September 2018) issues of the AJiC Fact Sheet present data on drug sale and manufacture arrests and drug possession arrests in Alaska for 1986 to 2017. Data are drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
Drug Sale and Manufacture Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017

Drug Sale and Manufacture Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017
(AJiC Fact Sheet 18-04)

This fact sheet presents data on drug sale and manufacture arrests reported by Alaska law enforcement agencies for the 32-year period 1986 to 2017. Overall, the drug sale and manufacture arrest rate consistently declined between 1997 and 2017.  The lowest recorded overall drug sale and manufacture arrest rate was in 2017. While drug sale and manufacture arrest rates for females and juveniles were relatively stable, arrest rates for males and adults showed a pronounced decrease.

Citation:
Drug Possession Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017

Drug Possession Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1986–2017
(AJiC Fact Sheet 18-05) 

This fact sheet presents presents data on drug sale possession arrests reported by Alaska law enforcement agencies for the 32-year period 1986 to 2017. Overall, the drug possession arrest rate plateaued between 1998 and 2010, consistently declined from 2010 to 2016, and slightly increased in 2017.  The lowest recorded overall drug possession arrest rate was in 1990. Rates increased from 1986 through 1998, then declined for all populations from 2010 to 2016. The adult and male populations drive the overall trend in arrest rates, accounting for roughly four out of every five arrestees during this 32-year period. The trend shows less discrepancy in arrest rates between males and females, as well as between adults and juveniles after 2010.

The fact sheets are by Benjamin Ervin, Research Professional, Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC). The AJiC Fact Sheet series addresses various crime and criminal justice topics.

Citation:

Monday, August 20, 2018

Justice Center welcomes three new faculty!

Rita Augustyn, Ph.D.
Rita Augustyn, PhD, joins the Justice Center faculty this fall after receiving her PhD from the University of Nebraska at Omaha in Criminology and Criminal Justice. Dr. Augustyn’s primary areas of research are in corrections, inmate reentry, prison-based treatment, sexual offending, and the effects of race and age. In addition to her dissertation, which evaluates prison-based residential substance use treatment programs, she is interested in exploring the definition of “older” populations and age cutoffs, with eye toward finding the tipping point where misconduct changes.

Dr. Augustyn has interned both at the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services in the Adult Protection Services unit and the Nebraska Department of Correctional Services in the Planning and Research Division. The internships have provided opportunities to research vulnerable adult abuse and prison-based sex offender treatment. Dr. Augustyn uses both her academic background and experience in real-world situations to provide a multi-dimensional approach to teaching.

A lifelong Nebraskan, Dr. Augustyn, applied to UAA undergrad, but decided to stay in Nebraska to help with the costs of college. She received her PhD, M.A., and B.A. in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Nebraska at Omaha, where she received a scholarship to go to graduate school. Dr. Augustyn is delighted to finally have the opportunity to be at UAA, the Justice Center,  and to live in Alaska.

Fall semester 2018, Dr. Augustyn is teaching Principles of Corrections (JUST 210) and Intro to Justice (JUST 110). She is also working with the Alaska Department of Corrections on a reentry project. You can reach Dr. Augustyn at rjaugustyn2@alaska.edu or 786-4302.

Ingrid Diane Johnson, Ph.D.
Ingrid Diane Johnson, PhD, joins the UAA Justice Center this fall as an assistant professor. Raised in Delta Junction and Fairbanks in Interior Alaska, Dr. Johnson received her B.A. in Justice from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and completed both an M.A. and PhD in Criminal Justice at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA. The focus of much of Dr. Johnson’s research is on help-seeking among survivors of sexual assault and intimate partner violence and sexual assault, and how formal and informal networks can improve those processes.

Although Dr. Johnson left Alaska to pursue graduate studies in criminal justice, she brought with her a long-term commitment to addressing crime and justice issues in Alaska. Her research while at Temple University included rural and urban differences in relation to criminal justice, and access to substance abuse treatment for individuals involved in the criminal justice system.  She is the co-author of “Rural Location and Relative Location: Adding Community Context to the Study of Sexual Assault Time Until Presentation for Medical Care,” which studied sexual assault cases in eight Alaska communities.

This fall 2018, Dr. Johnson will bring both her academic background and personal knowledge of rural Alaska, to Rural Justice (JUST 355). The course explores geographic, social and cultural characteristics of Alaska’s rural communities and how these factors can influence the prevalence and nature of crime and criminal justice. In addition, she is teaching Introduction to Research Methods (JUST 200).

Dr. Johnson is also working in partnership with the Alaska Department of Public Safety as the principal research investigator for the Alaska Sexual Assault Kit Initiative (AK-SAKI). You can reach Dr. Johnson at idjohnson@alaska.edu or 786-1126.

University of Alaska Anchorage
Yeungjeom Lee, PhD’s road to becoming an assistant professor at UAA’s Justice Center is the culmination of many years of determination to follow her passion to study criminology. Dr. Lee received both her B.A. in Psychology and M.A. in Forensic Psychology in Korea and then traveled to the University of Florida in Gainesville (UF) where she completed a PhD in Criminology, Law & Society.

This fall 2018, Dr. Lee is teaching Crime and Delinquency (JUST 251) and Juvenile Justice and Delinquency (JUST 375). The subject matter fits well within her research areas that include juvenile delinquency, criminological theory, victimization, and psychopathy. During her master’s study in forensic psychology she developed, and published, a Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder assessment scale for victims of intimate violence.  At the University of Florida’s PhD program she focused on various criminological theories, using advanced analytical techniques, while maintaining a life-course/developmental orientation. Her central focus being the basic question – why do some people commit crimes while others do not?

Dr. Lee’s recent or forthcoming publications appear in Criminal Justice and Behavior, Crime & Delinquency, Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, Deviant Behavior, American Journal of Criminal Justice, and Korean Journal of Forensic Psychology.

After a number of years working on her PhD in Florida, Dr. Lee is looking forward to living in Alaska where she will enjoy the beautiful nature of Alaska and be closer to her family in Korea .

You can reach Dr. Lee at gatoryjlee@gmail.com or 786-1856.

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Alumni spotlight: Yevgenii Kisarauskas. BA Justice 2013, MA Criminal Justice 2018, headed for a career in law enforcement

Yevgenii Kisarauskas, B.A. Justice 2013, B.A. Psychology 2016, M.A. Criminal Justice 2018, started out as an undergrad at Montana State University, but transferred to UAA after a year because they didn't have a criminal justice degree program. At UAA, he took a course in criminology from Dr. Troy Payne and really liked his teaching style. “His enthusiasm was contagious,” said Kisarauskas.  It was through Dr. Payne that Kisarauskas came to know about the excellent graduate Justice program at the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Payne received his PhD from the University of Cincinnati (UC) in 2010. This summer, Kisarauskas received his M.A. in Criminal Justice from UC.
Yevgenii Kisarauskas

Kisarauskas, who was born in Russia in 1990 and emigrated to Alaska with his parents in 2000, wasn’t ready to finish his undergraduate education at UAA with a B.A. in Justice in 2013. He decided to turn a minor in psychology to a full degree and completed his second B.A. in 2016. After graduating, he took a year off from school to work as a substance abuse counselor in Sitka.

In fall 2017, Kisarauskas entered the University of Cincinnati master’s program with a full scholarship. He gives the UAA Justice Center program credit for providing great preparation for graduate work.  At UC, Kisarauskas excelled with a 4.0 GPA.
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This fall, Kisarauskas is looking at positions in law enforcement on the west coast. His goal down the road is to work for the FBI or Federal Marshals’ office.  For now, though, he’s looking at sheriffs’ offices and police departments where he’ll begin the career in law enforcement that he’s always wanted.

Wednesday, August 8, 2018

Rural justice course investigates rural crime and criminal justice

What is justice for rural communities? Explore this question (and more) by registering for: Rural Justice (JUST A355), Fall 2018,  Tuesdays and Thursdays  1 to 2:15 PM. Prerequisites: JUST 110 and Junior or Senior standing (Exceptions made upon instructor approval). CRN: 77495. Fulfills Alaska Native-Themed GER. Contact Ingrid Johnson at idjohnson@alaska.edu or 907 786 1126 with questions.
Learn about geographic, social and cultural characteristics of Alaska's rural communities and how these factors can influence the prevalence and nature of crime and criminal justice in the fall 2018 course, Rural Justice (JUST A355). Students will have an opportunity to review competing theories of justice, as well as do a comparative analysis of rural crime and criminal justice in other countries, with emphasis given to other circumpolar nations. Registration restrictions apply. Contact Ingrid Johnson, idjohnson@alaska.edu, 786-1126, with questions.

Tuesday, August 7, 2018

AJiC Fact Sheet presents data on drug-related cases filed in Alaska courts, FY 2008–2017

Drug Cases Filed across the Alaska Court System, FY 2008–2017
The 18-03 issue (August 2018) of the AJiC Fact Sheet, "Drug Cases Filed across the Alaska Court System, FY 2008–2017," presents data on drug-related court filings throughout the state of Alaska for fiscal years (FY) 2008 through 2017 and the 10-year trend of misdemeanor and felony drug case filings for Alaska and for the Anchorage, Palmer, Kenai and Fairbanks courts over the same period.

Overall, felony drug case filing rates remained stable or increased in all locations until FY15 or FY16, before decreasing dramatically from FY16 to FY17. The exception is the Fairbanks court, which maintained an overall decrease in felony drug case filing rates over the 10-year period. Misdemeanor drug case filing rates, regardless of whether they increased or decreased between FY 2008–2014, decreased in all locations from FY 2014–2016 before increasing from FY 2016–2017. The year with the lowest felony drug case filing rate, for all locations, was in FY17. The lowest misdemeanor drug case filing rate, for all locations, was in FY16. Data is drawn from annual reports of the Alaska Court System for the FY 2008 through 2017.

The fact sheet is by Daniel Reinhard, Research Professional, Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC). The AJiC Fact Sheet series addresses various crime and criminal justice topics.

Monday, August 6, 2018

Expanded Brownfields Program supports redevelopment in Alaska

Keku Cannery, Kake
Keku Cannery, Kake. Photo from Alaska
Department of Environmental Conservation.
This year, Congress expanded eligibility requirements and grant limits under the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Brownfields Program. An article in the Summer 2018 Alaska Justice Forum looks at this EPA program that supports redevelopment of property which may have contaminants from prior use. Anchorage, Mat-Su Borough, and Kodiak Island Borough are current recipients of Brownfield funds.

Friday, August 3, 2018

Mat-Su leadership respond to Justice Center workload-based report showing need for more Troopers, ask voters to weigh in

Alaska State Troopers B Detachment Patrol Staffing Study and Description of Dispatched Police Incidents
Mat-Su Borough Assembly approved putting language on the October 2 ballot to let voters weigh in on whether they want additional law enforcement in Mat-Su. The ballot measure, proposed by Assembly member Jim Sykes, is in response to a Justice Center report showing the need for increased Trooper staffing. The workload-based staffing model for Alaska State Troopers B Detachment, developed in a report authored by Troy Payne, associate director of the Alaska Justice Information Center and Justice faculty, is featured in the April 2018 Alaska Justice Forum. Responses to the study have been the subject of  recent KTVA news and other media reports:

Fortson & Payne article shows importance of legal representation for both parents in custody proceedings


Dr. Ryan Fortson and Dr. Troy C. Payne's article, "Lawyering Up: The Effects of Legal Counsel on Outcomes of Custody Determinations," published in the Winter 2018 edition of the UC Davis Journal of Juvenile Law & Policy, is currently available through Westlaw or Lexis at 22 U.C. Davis J. Juv. L. & Pol'y 1.

Prof. Ryan Fortson
Prof. Troy C. Payne
Fortson and Payne, Justice Center faculty, provide an empirical approach for determining whether being represented by an attorney increases the likelihood of success in obtaining one’s desired outcome as expressed in the parent's initial custody request. Many existing studies look at final outcomes in relation to the legal representation status of an individual parent, ignoring the issue of whether the parent achieved his or her initial custody request, as well as the effect of the representation status of the other parent. After controlling for initial custody request and the legal representation status of both parents, Fortson and Payne find that having an attorney can increase the chances of a parent achieving his or her desired custody outcome, but only if that parent is represented and the other parent is not represented. These results can have a substantial impact on those advocating for the increased availability of free or low-cost legal services in child custody proceedings.

A link to the Winter 2018 edition of the UC Davis Journal of Juvenile Law & Policy will be posted when available.

Thursday, August 2, 2018

We're back at our Consortium Library location!

Moving boxes
After a summer spent in offices located off-campus to allow for renovation at the UAA/APU Consortium Library, Justice Center faculty and staff have returned to their offices in the Consortium Library, Suite 213. The Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC) will also be moving back to the Consortium Library from its temporary summer home, but not until later in the fall. If you have any questions, please call 786-1810.

Monday, July 30, 2018

Environmental contaminants are ‘generational game changer’

Annie Alowa at a contaminated site on St. Lawrence Island. Alowa led the effort to get the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to clean up Northeast Cape. She died from liver cancer in 1999.  In 2016 she was inducted into the Alaska Women’s Hall of Fame. Photo courtesy Alaska Community Action on Toxics.
Annie Alowa at a contaminated site on St. Lawrence Island.
Photo courtesy Alaska Community Action on Toxics.
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers spent $125 million to clean up contaminants left behind when the U.S. Air Force base at Northeast Cape on St. Lawrence Island closed in 1972. An article in the Summer 2018 Alaska Justice Forum discusses studies following the cleanup. While state and federal health studies recommend continued reliance upon traditional foods, St. Lawrence Island community members are conducting their own studies. They fear contaminants in traditional foods may be contributing to elevated levels of PCBs in their blood, higher cancer rates, and reproductive system challenges.

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Challenges of contaminated site cleanup in rural Alaska

Contaminated sites in Alaska, FY 2017. This map marks the locations of contaminated sites throughout Alaska that have been identified by the Alaska Department of Environmental Conversation.  Source: Contaminated Sites Database, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation
Contaminated sites in Alaska, FY 2017.
Source: Contaminated Sites Database,
Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation.
Alaska is ranked third in the U.S. for Formerly Used Defense Sites properties, most of which are in remote locations. Many of the sites were contaminated during World War II, or during the Cold War, when the long-term effects of chemicals were not understood. An article in the Summer 2018 Alaska Justice Forum looks at long term efforts to clean up these, and other contaminated sites in the state, and the disproportionate impact on rural Alaska Native communities.

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Alumni spotlight: Daniel Reinhard, Justice B.A. 2015, Criminology M.A. 2017, working with AJiC this summer

Daniel Reinhard, Justice B.A. 2015, Criminology M.A. 2017, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, B.C., is currently enrolled in a Ph.D. program at Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas. This summer, Reinhard is working as a research professional in the Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC) with Associate AJiC Director and Justice faculty Dr. Troy Payne.

Reinhard's work for AJiC includes compiling Alaska criminal justice data for AJiC Fact Sheets, a series of publications that address crime and criminal justice topics. Reinhard is also assisting with the Law Enforcement and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS) survey in Alaska, and the LEMAS Tribal Community Public Safety Supplement survey. Both are related to better understanding law enforcement staffing and resource needs throughout the state.

As an undergraduate, Reinhard worked on a case study of Town Square Park in downtown Anchorage. He co-authored an article with Dr. Payne,  "The Complexity of Problem-Solving in Urban Parks: A Case Study,"  published in the journal, International Criminal Justice Review, in 2016.

Dr.  Sharon Chamard, Justice faculty, calls Reinhard one of her "best crime prevention students." Last summer, she traveled to Vancouver, B.C.  to be an outside reader and external examiner for Reinhard's master's thesis defense.

Reinhard's area of interest is environmental criminology and international crime prevention. In the fall, he is taking Ph.D. courses at Texas State related to crime mapping, behavioral sciences, and sex offenders, as well as teaching an undergraduate class on crime theory and victimization. When  not taking courses and teaching, Reinhard is working on panhandling and homeless research in Austin, Texas.

Monday, July 16, 2018

Environmental justice in Summer 2018 Alaska Justice Forum

The 2018 summer edition of the Alaska Justice Forum looks at environmental and rural justice topics including ongoing challenges of cleaning up contaminated sites in Alaska.

Contaminated sites in Alaska, FY 2017, Contaminated Sites Database, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation.
Alaska is ranked third in the U.S. for Formerly Used Defense Sites properties.  Most of these properties are in remote locations, placing a disproportionate impact on Alaska Native communities that depend upon environmental resources for their livelihood. This environmental justice issue is explored in terms of the costs of cleanup and long-term impacts upon people and the environment.

This year, Congress expanded eligibility and increased limits on Brownfields Program funds.  The Brownfields Program provides funds for assessment and cleanup of contaminants on property targeted for redevelopment.  Anchorage, Mat-Su and Kodiak are among current recipients of Brownfields grants in Alaska.

The Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC) recently released its Fact Sheet, Parole and Probation in Alaska, 2002-2016. The Fact Sheet is included in the Alaska Justice Forum’s online edition.
2018 summer Alaska Justice Forum articles include:
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Tuesday, July 3, 2018

Gov. Walker signs bill supporting sexual assault kit testing and standardizing investigations

Gov. Bill Walker signed House Bill 31 last week requiring a yearly accounting of untested sexual assault kits in the state, as well as providing systems for standardizing sexual assault investigations. Alaska police academies are now required to teach sexual assault investigative techniques and law.

Brad Myrstol, Justice Center director, is a member of the Sexual Assault Kit Initiative Working Group, which is working with the Alaska Department of Public Safety to develop a protocol for dealing with untested kits and creating a sustainable  and victim-centered response to sexual assault cases moving forward. Myrstol, along with Ingrid Johnson, new Justice faculty with an expertise in domestic violence and sexual assault, attended the signing of the bill on Friday, June 29.

Nearly a third (33.1%) of adult women in Alaska have experienced sexual violence in their lifetime, according to the  2015 Alaska Victimization Survey. The survey is conducted by the  Justice Center for the Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault.

For more on Alaska's Sexual Assault Kit Initiative see the Spring 2018 Alaska Justice Forum.

Monday, July 2, 2018

Payne quoted in motor vehicle theft story, AJiC provides additional information

Troy Payne, Justice faculty and Alaska Justice Information Center Associate Director, was quoted in an Anchorage Daily News story on the impact of having a car stolen. "The tendency is to say, 'Oh[,] it[']s just property, it's replaceable.' If you're insured it's not that big of a deal....It's actually really traumatic to have that sort of violation," according to Payne. The story is part of a series on factors involving growing car thefts in Anchorage, including, "$45 million in property was stolen in Anchorage last year," and "How counterfeit cash, SB 91 and stolen guns fit into the Anchorage car theft epidemic: A Q&A with detectives."

For additional resources see Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC) publications including:
Value of Stolen Property Reported in Alaska, 1985–2016,by Random Reamey,
Motor Vehicle Theft Arrests Reported in Alaska, 1985–2015, by Random Reamey

BJS report shows uptick in reporting of prison sexual victimization

The Bureau of Justice Statistics  released a summary of efforts during 2017 and 2018 to collect data and report on the incidence and effects of sexual victimization in correctional facilities as required by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (PREA). The report shows nearly triple the number of reported allegations of sexual victimization, 24,661 in 2015, as compared to 8,768 in 2011. Substantiated allegations rose form 902 in 2011 to 1,473 in 205 (up 63%).

Among the 24,661 allegations of sexual victimization in 2015, a total of 1,473 were substantiated, 10,142 were unfounded, 10,313 were unsubstantiated, and 2,733 were still under investigation. The sharp rise in unfounded or unsubstantiated allegations of sexual victimization coincided with the release of the National Standards to Prevent, Detect, and Respond to Prison Rape in 2012. It reflects improvements in data collection and reporting by correctional authorities, and increased reporting of allegations by inmates.

The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services  2015 PREA Annual report for the Division of Juvenile Justice, (DJJ), also reflects an increase in the report of allegations since PREA standards were released in 2012. In 2011, DJJ reports seven allegations (one substantiated) and in 2015, 28 allegations (eight substantiated) - four times as many. 

The Alaska Department of Corrections 2016 and 2017 PREA annual reports earliest numbers are from 2014, making it difficult to track the impact of the 2012 national standards on reporting of allegations. In 2014, there were 42 allegations (13 substantiated) and in 2017 there were 36 allegations (five substantiated).


Friday, June 29, 2018

New Results First clearinghouse provides easy access to information on evidenced-based programs and their effectiveness

The Pew Charitable Trust and John D.MacArthur Foundation's Results First team just released a new user interface for the Results First Clearinghouse Database.  The clearinghouse allows people to search for evidence-based programs in multiple policy areas and to see how the programs are rated for effectiveness.

Program categories available for search are: Crime & delinquency, child & family well-being, education, employment & job training, mental health, public health, sexual behavior & teen pregnancy, and substance abuse.

Monday, June 18, 2018

2017 Campus Climate Survey Results

Results from a survey of undergraduate degree-seeking students at the University of Alaska released in May, show that an estimated nine percent of students experienced sexual misconduct and an estimated 11.7 percent experienced stalking or harassment. The University of Alaska Title IX Office survey, administered and analyzed by the Justice Center, was sent to 10,000 students and had 710 respondents.

Justice Center Director Brad Myrstol, author of the report, told the Northern Light that, "[T]o the extent that surveys are done in the future, it provides a framework by which the university can monitor its progress and success over time." He added that the findings in the university's report are "largely consistent" with reports from other universities. The survey is part of the University of Alaska's Voluntary Resolution Agreement with the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights. The next survey is planned for the spring of 2019.